Joy: 100 Poems edited by Christian Wiman

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Joy: 100 Poems edited by Christian Wiman

With all of the suffering and injustice in the world, it's no wonder that the topic of joy is lacking in modern literature.  Christian Wiman, a poet known for his meditations on mortality, was fascinated by this absence and decided to compile 100 works of poetry that explore the experience of joy.  The anthology features selections from Sylvia Plath, Wendell Berry, Mahmoud Darwish and many others.  The poems in this book work to reawaken the essential emotion of joy and to demonstrate how it can permeate through all aspects of human life.

joypoems1.jpg
joypoems2.jpg

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Sleeping By The Mississippi by Alec Soth

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Sleeping By The Mississippi by Alec Soth

The first photobook by Minnesota-based photographer Alec Soth was published in 2004 and features beautifully poetic snippets of the people, landscapes, and relics that lie adjacent to America's third coast, The Mississippi River.   The book features 46 photos that document a series of roadtrips along the river.  These photos elicit moods of hope, loneliness, and reverie while alluding to issues of crime, race, religion, politics, and death.

New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana

The publication is one of the defining works of the photobook era, and has sold through three editions since its first printing.  In conjuction with the series first exhibition at Beetle+Huxley gallery in London, MACK books has relaunched Sleeping By The Mississippi, adding two additional photos that were left out of the original printing.  This latest edition also includes a free fold-out poster.  

Bonnie (with photograph of an Angel), Port Gibson, Mississippi

Bonnie (with photograph of an Angel), Port Gibson, Mississippi

We are thrilled to add the latest edition of Sleeping by the Mississippi to our photography section here at The Stacks. 

Venice, Louisiana

Venice, Louisiana

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Bored and Brilliant by Manoush Zomorodi

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Bored and Brilliant by Manoush Zomorodi

This new book from Manoush Zomorodi is the result of a long time project. The Note to Self podcast host started the Bored and Brilliant project in 2015 and asked thousands of her listeners to join her as she led different experiments to help reassess our relationship with technology.

Something she discovered after looking back on her early years of motherhood when the only thing that would sooth her newborn was going on long, boring walks. She started to make connections between this time of solidarity where she was seemingly bored but her mind was coming up with all sorts of brilliant ideas. This moment of calm to detach from the chaos is necessary for balance but often times difficult to achieve in a world of constant stimulation. Facebook, instagram, twitter, snapchat, emails, game apps, all readily available on your smartphone means that you can be plugged in in some form or another 24/7. The Bored and Brilliant project challenges you for seven consecutive days to allow your mind to wander and be bored. This book is a cumulation of practical exercises and real life examples that demonstrate how boredom can enhance your ability to dream, wonder, and gain clarity in your work and life.

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Home, by Carson Ellis

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Home, by Carson Ellis

In this absolutely wonderful children’s book, illustrator and author Carson Ellis orchestrates an imaginary taxonomy of houses and different people who inhabit them.

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How to See: Visual Adventures in a World God Never Made by George Nelson

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How to See: Visual Adventures in a World God Never Made by George Nelson

“Seeing is not a unique God-given talent, but a discipline.  It can be learned.” - George Nelson

In "How To See: Visual Adventures in a World God Never Made" George Nelson expands upon the idea of SEEING as an artistic discipline. Nelson was a pioneer and jack of all (design) trades during the 20th century. He practiced and preached the idea of "Visual Literacy" which is the ability to decode nonverbal messages. He felt that anyone could learn to read images in the same way that they read words: through experience, exposure and practice. By discussing themes of communication, art, geometry, and variation with photographic examples and written text, "How To See" works as a primer for understanding visual literacy  and has become a cult classic among artists since it’s publication in 1977.

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Paper Airplanes: The Collections of Harry Smith

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Paper Airplanes: The Collections of Harry Smith

Harry Smith is a wildly fascinating man. He was a filmmaker, painter, musicologist, but he defined himself primarily as an anthropologist. Throughout his lifetime he collected numerous items. What remains one of his most mysterious collecting endeavors is his extensive collection of paper airplanes. Over the course of 20 years Smith collected these airplanes, annotating the date and street where it was found along the way.

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OYSTER: A Gastronomic History with Recipes

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OYSTER: A Gastronomic History with Recipes

Whether you love ‘em or hate ‘em, Oysters are as New Orleans as Jazz Music, Streetcars, and Sazeracs. On a daily basis we are inundated with images of oysters sandwiched in a po’boy or stirred into a jambalaya, yet many of us may not know the real history behind these famous mollusks.

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Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia by Andrew Blauvelt

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Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia by Andrew Blauvelt

Pop, Conceptualism, Land Art, Body Art, and Minimalism are typically movements that come to mind when one thinks about art of the 1960s.  In the catalogue, Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia, author Andrew Blauvelt delves into the more esoteric artistic exercises that echoed the political landscape of this era.  

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